This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Official Information request 'Homeopathic Products - fair trading'.


 
 
13 April 2017 
 
B White 
c/o FYI.org.nz 
By email only: [email address] 
 
Dear B White 
Official Information Act #16.133 – Homeopathic Products 
1. 
We refer to your Official Information Act 1982 (OIA) request of 16 March 2017 for 
the following information: 
“1. How many complaints to the commerce commission about homeopathic products in the 
last 5 years. 
2.  The  number  of  these  complaints  which  resulted  in  warnings,  or  other  enforcement 
actions. 
3. The number of self initiated (initiated by the commission or another government agency) 
investigations into homeopathic products in the last 5 years. 
4.  The  number  of  these  investigations  which  resulted  in  warnings,  or  other  enforcement 
actions. 
5.  If  any  guidelines  exist  (internally  or  public)  in  relation  to  the  standards  of  evidence 
required for producers of supplements and or homeopathic remedies to not be considered 
by the commission as misleading in relation to claims made in selling these products.  
6.  If  in  the  commissions  opinion,  the  act  of  selling  products  by  pharmacies  that  have  no 
scientific basis to their claims is misleading to consumers.” 
2. 
We have structured our response in relation to your enquiries. 
Questions 1-4 
Search of the Commission’s database for relevant complaints  
3. 
When  someone  contacts  the  Commission  with  a  question,  comment,  or  complaint 
about a company, this information is stored in our database.  For your OIA request, a 
wide  range  of  search  terms  were  used  in  order  to  capture  a  complete  view  of 
alternative health products. To determine the number of complaints the Commission 
received  about  homeopathic  products  from  16  March  2012  to  16  March  2017,  we 
searched the Commission’s enquiries database for the following terms: 
3.1 
homeopath*;  
 

 
 

3.2 
alternative; 
3.3 
holistic; 
3.4 
health; 
3.5 
medic*; 
3.6 
natural; 
3.7 
pharma*;  
3.8 
remed*; and 
3.9 
supplement*. 
4. 
Once we had the complete picture of alternative health reports1 made in the last five 
years,  we  were  able  to  filter  the  results  down  to  the  ones  relevant  to  your  OIA 
request about homeopathic products.   
5. 
Since  16  March  2012,  the  Commission  has  received  a  total  of  31  reports  about 
homeopathic  products.    The  Commission  has  not  “self-initiated”  any  investigations 
into homeopathic products. 
6. 
A  full  breakdown  of  the  outcomes  for  the  complaints  can  be  found  in  the  table 
below. 
No. of reports 
Outcome of report 
Failed enforcement criteria at the initial assessment and no 
23 
further action was taken 

Waiting for initial assessment decision 
Information about the complaint has been passed to the 

trader 

Complaint referred to MedSafe 

Under investigation 
 
7. 
What the above table shows is that, at present, none of the complaints have resulted 
in warnings or court proceedings.  When the Commission passes information to the 
trader, we provide information on the nature of the report received and guidance on 
the trader’s obligations under the Act.  We do not investigate the matter any further 
and consider the matter closed. 
8. 
Attachment A provides information on the Commission’s complaints and screening 
process. 
                                                      
1  
A report refers to any enquiry, comment, or complaint made to the Commission. 
2691426.1 


 
 

 Question 5 
9. 
The  Commission  does  not  have  guidelines  that  are  specific  to  the  producers  of 
supplements or homeopathic remedies.   
10. 
This is not to say that these traders are exempt from abiding by the Fair Trading Act 
1986.  All traders must comply with the Act.   
10.1  Traders supplying homeopathic remedies must ensure that they do not make 
misleading claims about the health benefits of their products.   
10.2  The Commission’s health and nutrition claims fact sheet covers what traders 
need to know in order to comply with the Act and what consumers need to 
be aware of when purchasing products. 
11. 
While the Commission regulates the Fair Trading Act,  there are other organisations 
such  as  Medsafe2  and  Food  Standards  Australia  New  Zealand3  that  also  monitor 
traders who make health benefit claims about their products.   
Question 6 
12. 
The  Commission  does  not  mandate  the  types  of  products  that  pharmacies  can  or 
cannot  sell.    It  is  a  breach  of  the  law  for  any  trader  to  make  claims  that  are  false, 
misleading  or  unsubstantiated.    Please  refer  to  the  Commission’s  fact  sheet  on 
unsubstantiated representations for more information. 
Further information 
13. 
If you are not satisfied with the Commission's response to your OIA request, section 
28(3) of the OIA provides you with the right to ask an Ombudsman to investigate and 
review this response. 
14. 
If you have any questions in regards to this request, please do not hesitate to contact 
us at [email address] 
 
Yours sincerely 
 
 
Lynette Gollop-Davidson 
OIA Coordinator 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                      
2  
http://www.medsafe.govt.nz/ 
3  
http://www.foodstandards.govt.nz/Pages/default.aspx  
2691426.1 

 
 

 
 
 
Attachment A - The Commission’s complaints and screening process 
1. 
To provide background and context to our response, we provide a summary of our 
screening process4 below.  
2. 
The Commission’s screening process has been established to deal with the thousands 
of reports received each year and to determine which reports should be investigated 
further.  
3. 
Every  report  is  initially  assessed  by  our  Enquiries  Team  on  the  basis  of  the 
information  provided.    When  conducting  this  initial  assessment,  the  Commission 
considers: 
3.1 
the likelihood of a breach of the relevant legislation (namely the Fair Trading 
Act  1986  (the  Act),  Credit  Contracts  and  Consumer  Finance  2003,  and  the 
Commerce Act 1986); 
3.2 
the Commission’s Enforcement Response Guidelines;5 and 
3.3 
the Commission’s strategic priorities and resourcing constraints. 
4. 
If  a  report  is  initially  considered  by  our  Enquiries  Team  to  meet  our  criteria,  the 
report is further considered and sent to a panel of managers for decision.  The panel 
is made up of five senior managers within the Commission. These managers review 
each report and make decisions on how we should proceed.  
5. 
Though  the  Commission  has  the  power  to  act  on  reports  which  we  consider  may 
breach  the  Act,  we  are  not  a  complaint  handling  body  and  cannot  take  action  on 
every report we receive. The Commission seeks to ensure that high priority matters 
are addressed first.  
6. 
Following the screening process, a report will either be closed or transferred to the 
investigations  team.    The  action  the  Commission  takes  is  dependent  on  how  the 
report fits with the enforcement criteria.6   
 
 
                                                      
4  
Please refer to pages 10-11 of the “Competition and Consumer Investigation Guidelines – December 
2015” for information on the screening process (http://www.comcom.govt.nz/the-
commission/commission-policies/competition-and-consumer-investigation-guidelines/). 
 
5  
http://www.comcom.govt.nz/the-commission/commission-policies/enforcement-response-guidelines/  
6  
http://www.comcom.govt.nz/the-commission/commission-policies/enforcement-criteria/ 
2691426.1 

Document Outline